State:

National
A key task for employers is locating job applicants possessing needed skills. Although this is occasionally done through word of mouth or employee recommendations, it is still most successfully done through job advertising. Government contractors must advertise their job openings.
In advertising for candidates, it is essential to describe the requirements of the job clearly. If advertisements are not precise, employers can waste time sifting through underqualified and overqualified applicants.
Federal antidiscrimination laws--Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act--prohibit employment advertisements that express a preference on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, religion, age, genetic information, or disability. This includes all sources of advertisement, including the Internet.
Bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ) exception. An advertisement may express a preference for one of these characteristics if it is a BFOQ reasonably necessary for the operation of the business. This is a very narrow and restricted exception. For example, a manufacturer of men's clothing can lawfully advertise for male models. In general, race or color cannot be a BFOQ.
The Immigration and Nationality Act prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of citizenship or immigration status, including in advertisements, unless required by law, regulation, or government contract.
Discrimination against the long-term unemployed. Several states have passed legislation banning employers from indicating in advertisements that they will only consider currently employed or recently unemployed applicants. Employers should check state laws and local ordinances that may prohibit this form of discrimination.
The federal government requires government contractors to include the phrase “Equal Opportunity Employer” equal opportunity “taglines’” in all vacancy announcements.
So, for example, a contractor subject to the requirements of Executive Order 11246 would include the tagline “EOE Minorities/Women” in its vacancy announcements. As a matter of standard practice, most noncontractors now also include the phrase in their ads.
Individuals with disabilities and protected veterans. Contractors covered by Section 503 and the Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA) may refer to "individuals with disabilities" (D ) and "protected veterans" (V) by these abbreviations, but such abbreviations must be commonly understood by those seeking employment. According to the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, simply using "D" and "V" are not adequate abbreviations for this reason.
Sexual orientation and gender identity. Effective April 8, 2015, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs’ (OFCCP) final rule implements Executive Order 13672, which extends sexual orientation and gender identity protections to employees and applicants in the federal contracting workplace. The final rule applies to all covered contracts with the federal government entered into or modified on or after that date.
Under both the Executive Order and the final rule, federal contracting agencies must include gender identity and sexual orientation as prohibited bases of discrimination under the equal opportunity (EO) clause.
The final rule requires that in all solicitations or advertisements for employees, contractors must “state that all qualified applicants will receive considerations for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or national origin.” According to the OFCCP, this requirement may be satisfied by either listing all protected classes or simply by stating that the contractor is an” “Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE)” (with no reference to each individual protected class).
Please see the national Affirmative Action section.
Placement of ads. Federal contractors should place their ads in publications, websites, and media read by members of minorities, disabled individuals, veterans, and/or protected classes and keep a record of where and when ads are placed.
Please see the national Government Contractors section.
Advertisements are usually written as concisely as possible to save space. Typically they describe the employer, the key requirements for the job, and give contact information. Online job ads are generally not as confined in terms of length. Still, simplicity should always be the keynote of every employment ad. It should be clear and functional and contain, briefly, the important needs of the job. Employers often include a description of the organization and the benefits of being employed there.
Gender-neutral terms. Use gender-neutral terms in advertisements (e.g., waitstaff rather than waiter, meter reader rather than meter maid). Eliminate use of terms with a gender connotation.
Phone number. If you put a phone number in your ad, it may encourage phone responses. Decide if you want to take phone calls or confine responses to e-mails or letters.
Internet jobsites. Employment websites/jobsites have become the most popular way to advertise, often at little or no cost. Internet advertising can be as successful in filing entry-level positions as in finding executives.
There are numerous online options where employers can attract a good selection of candidates because they can target professional groups or geographic areas, There are also many niche jobsites for those in specific professions, allowing employers to more easily reach a target audience. Prospective job applicants may also post their credentials, availability, etc.
Some state department of labor websites allow employers to post job openings for free. A listing of state job banks is available from CareerOneStop, sponsored by the US. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration athttp://www.ajb.dni.us.
Your company's website. Don't forget to post your advertisements on your own company website, ideally on an "employment" or "job openings" Web page.
Social media. Social media, such as LinkedIn, Facebook, and Google+, are a good place to post job advertisements because job applicants use these a job search tools. Create a company account, where you can also post information on your company for prospective applicants. Social media sites of professional organizations often allow postings of job openings as well.
Newspapers, magazines, and journals. Despite the growth of the Internet as a recruiting tool, traditional print advertising remains a popular way to seek qualified candidates. For professional or skilled jobs, "targeted" print media, such as industry magazines and journals, work best.
Employment agencies. Most state departments of labor have employment services. There are also several private employment agencies and recruiters who can do much of the recruiting legwork for employers (for a fee). Note that state laws often govern advertising by employment agencies.
Designating one person in the company--preferably from HR--to oversee all media advertising ensures a degree of proficiency and consistency. To make certain that the wording of all ads is legal and accurate, this person should be assigned the responsibility of giving final approval to any ad before it is published or posted.
Advertising agencies. There are many ad agencies that specialize in help wanted and recruitment advertising. These may be helpful when conducting large, nationwide campaigns or executive searches.
Rates. Online job ad rates vary widely. Many will give discounts based on the number of listings. Meanwhile, competition from websites has lowered the cost of ads in newspapers and local papers, which have different rates based on the length of placement. Most newspapers also have online jobsites.
Please see the national Hiring section.
Last reviewed October December 2014.
Related Topics:
National
A key task for employers is locating job applicants possessing needed skills. Although this is occasionally done through word of mouth or employee recommendations, it is still most successfully done through job advertising. Government contractors must advertise their job openings.
In advertising for candidates, it is essential to describe the requirements of the job clearly. If advertisements are not precise, employers can waste time sifting through underqualified and overqualified applicants.
Federal antidiscrimination laws--Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act--prohibit employment advertisements that express a preference on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, religion, age, genetic information, or disability. This includes all sources of advertisement, including the Internet.
Bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ) exception. An advertisement may express a preference for one of these characteristics if it is a BFOQ reasonably necessary for the operation of the business. This is a very narrow and restricted exception. For example, a manufacturer of men's clothing can lawfully advertise for male models. In general, race or color cannot be a BFOQ.
The Immigration and Nationality Act prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of citizenship or immigration status, including in advertisements, unless required by law, regulation, or government contract.
Discrimination against the long-term unemployed. Several states have passed legislation banning employers from indicating in advertisements that they will only consider currently employed or recently unemployed applicants. Employers should check state laws and local ordinances that may prohibit this form of discrimination.
The federal government requires government contractors to include the phrase “Equal Opportunity Employer” equal opportunity “taglines’” in all vacancy announcements.
So, for example, a contractor subject to the requirements of Executive Order 11246 would include the tagline “EOE Minorities/Women” in its vacancy announcements. As a matter of standard practice, most noncontractors now also include the phrase in their ads.
Individuals with disabilities and protected veterans. Contractors covered by Section 503 and the Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA) may refer to "individuals with disabilities" (D ) and "protected veterans" (V) by these abbreviations, but such abbreviations must be commonly understood by those seeking employment. According to the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, simply using "D" and "V" are not adequate abbreviations for this reason.
Sexual orientation and gender identity. Effective April 8, 2015, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs’ (OFCCP) final rule implements Executive Order 13672, which extends sexual orientation and gender identity protections to employees and applicants in the federal contracting workplace. The final rule applies to all covered contracts with the federal government entered into or modified on or after that date.
Under both the Executive Order and the final rule, federal contracting agencies must include gender identity and sexual orientation as prohibited bases of discrimination under the equal opportunity (EO) clause.
The final rule requires that in all solicitations or advertisements for employees, contractors must “state that all qualified applicants will receive considerations for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or national origin.” According to the OFCCP, this requirement may be satisfied by either listing all protected classes or simply by stating that the contractor is an” “Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE)” (with no reference to each individual protected class).
Please see the national Affirmative Action section.
Placement of ads. Federal contractors should place their ads in publications, websites, and media read by members of minorities, disabled individuals, veterans, and/or protected classes and keep a record of where and when ads are placed.
Please see the national Government Contractors section.
Advertisements are usually written as concisely as possible to save space. Typically they describe the employer, the key requirements for the job, and give contact information. Online job ads are generally not as confined in terms of length. Still, simplicity should always be the keynote of every employment ad. It should be clear and functional and contain, briefly, the important needs of the job. Employers often include a description of the organization and the benefits of being employed there.
Gender-neutral terms. Use gender-neutral terms in advertisements (e.g., waitstaff rather than waiter, meter reader rather than meter maid). Eliminate use of terms with a gender connotation.
Phone number. If you put a phone number in your ad, it may encourage phone responses. Decide if you want to take phone calls or confine responses to e-mails or letters.
Internet jobsites. Employment websites/jobsites have become the most popular way to advertise, often at little or no cost. Internet advertising can be as successful in filing entry-level positions as in finding executives.
There are numerous online options where employers can attract a good selection of candidates because they can target professional groups or geographic areas, There are also many niche jobsites for those in specific professions, allowing employers to more easily reach a target audience. Prospective job applicants may also post their credentials, availability, etc.
Some state department of labor websites allow employers to post job openings for free. A listing of state job banks is available from CareerOneStop, sponsored by the US. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration athttp://www.ajb.dni.us.
Your company's website. Don't forget to post your advertisements on your own company website, ideally on an "employment" or "job openings" Web page.
Social media. Social media, such as LinkedIn, Facebook, and Google+, are a good place to post job advertisements because job applicants use these a job search tools. Create a company account, where you can also post information on your company for prospective applicants. Social media sites of professional organizations often allow postings of job openings as well.
Newspapers, magazines, and journals. Despite the growth of the Internet as a recruiting tool, traditional print advertising remains a popular way to seek qualified candidates. For professional or skilled jobs, "targeted" print media, such as industry magazines and journals, work best.
Employment agencies. Most state departments of labor have employment services. There are also several private employment agencies and recruiters who can do much of the recruiting legwork for employers (for a fee). Note that state laws often govern advertising by employment agencies.
Designating one person in the company--preferably from HR--to oversee all media advertising ensures a degree of proficiency and consistency. To make certain that the wording of all ads is legal and accurate, this person should be assigned the responsibility of giving final approval to any ad before it is published or posted.
Advertising agencies. There are many ad agencies that specialize in help wanted and recruitment advertising. These may be helpful when conducting large, nationwide campaigns or executive searches.
Rates. Online job ad rates vary widely. Many will give discounts based on the number of listings. Meanwhile, competition from websites has lowered the cost of ads in newspapers and local papers, which have different rates based on the length of placement. Most newspapers also have online jobsites.
Please see the national Hiring section.
Last reviewed October December 2014.
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