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Claim Your Free Copy of Overtime Primer: Highlights from the New Regulations

The federal DOL overtime regulations go into effect this year. Are you ready?

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This report includes a summary of key changes, including the salary level test and salary basis test.

As a bonus, we've included a handy flowchart to help you determine exemption status under the FLSA.

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June 04, 2004
Report: Few Jobs Pay Women More than Men

A new Census Bureau study has found that there are few jobs in which women are paid more than men, and most of those jobs are in fields that employ predominantly men, the Associated Press reports.

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The study found that women who work removing hazardous waste earned about $1.09 for every dollar that men did, and women who worked installing telecommunication lines earned about $1.04 for every dollar that men did, the news service notes. In another three jobs--meeting and convention planners; dining room and cafeteria workers and bartender helpers; and construction trade helpers--women earn the same as men.

Using data from the 2000 Census, the bureau looked at 505 categories of jobs, but limited its study to occupations with 10,000 or more year-round, full-time workers, at least 1,000 male workers, and at least 1,000 female workers.

The jobs with the biggest disparity between men's and women's wages included paper goods machine setters, financial services sales agents, and judges. In these jobs, women earned about 56 cents for every dollar earned by men, according to the study.

Overall, the study found, women earned about 74 cents for every dollar earned by men, the AP notes.

Experts say the disparity could reflect factors such as discrimination and women leaving the workforce to raise children.


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