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Claim Your Free Copy of Overtime Primer: Highlights from the New Regulations

The federal DOL overtime regulations go into effect this year. Are you ready?

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This report includes a summary of key changes, including the salary level test and salary basis test.

As a bonus, we've included a handy flowchart to help you determine exemption status under the FLSA.

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June 17, 2011
Half of Employees Would Accept Promotion Without Raise

Over half (55 percent) of workers in a recent poll said they would accept a promotion without a raise. According to the survey, this practice is at least somewhat common at 22 percent of organizations.

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The OfficeTeam survey asked HR managers, "How common is it for your company to award promotions without salary increases?" Here are their responses:

Very common 3%
Somewhat common 19%
Not common at all 63%
We do not offer promotions without raises 14%
Don't know/no answer 1%

The survey also asked workers, "Would you be willing to accept a promotion from your company that didn't include a raise?" Here are their responses:

Yes 55%
No 39%
Don't know/no answer 6%

Robert Hosking, executive director of OfficeTeam, acknowledged that employers may want to reward employees through a title change even when they can’t immediately provide a raise. In those cases, OfficeTeam identifies five incentives that could be offered with a promotion:

  1. More vacation time.
  2. Bigger bonuses.
  3. Flexible schedules.
  4. Professional development.
  5. An equity stake.


Office Team

Featured Special Report:
Top 100 FLSA Overtime Q&As
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